Product design picks for June

A bell for runners so you can tell people when you’re coming up behind them – similar to a bell on a bicycle. I think this is pretty genius. This could also just be an app, but I suspect the ring reverberates better if it’s a physical one.

Designer: Kevin John Nadolny

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An LED that helps you communicate with other drivers. You can view it up to 50 feet away. There are shortcuts to the most used messages, and the controller has large buttons.

Designers: John Stanley, Nina Stanley, Harsha Venna & Harshit Aggarwal

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A clock that shows you the time in a new way. Because I work as a UX designer, I’m always looking for new interaction patterns and new interfaces – both digital and physical. This one is simply and unique.

Designer: Mattis Boets

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Interesting product ideas: April edition

Staircase Bookcase

A bookshelf that stacks vertically and doubles as a staircase so you can reach the top shelves. Made by Danny Kuo.

Jordi Ribaudi Chair

The floor chair. Simple in form and graceful to look at. By Jordi Ribaudi.

Jeho Yoon

Soft Dipper

The flexible ladle that gets into all the corners. This is so smart. Well done, Jeho Yoon.

March picks: thoughtful UX moments

In Singapore, senior citizens can tap their identity card on the sensor at the pedestrian crossing so that they can have 3-13 more seconds depending on the size of the crossing. This takes into consideration everyone’s mobility levels.

This hotel has fire escape plans at ground level, because chances are if it’s smokey you’ll be low to the ground.

Parking lines that go up the wall so you can actually see if you’re parking in the right position. All garages should have this.

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6 Things I learned from 3 Talks at UXPA Boston 2014

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Things I learned from UXPA – The TL;DA (Too Long; Didn’t Attend) Version

Designing for Large Touch Interfaces

  1. Make sure people know they can touch the screen.
  2. Orientation affects how users perceive the kiosk
  3. Transitions are important as cues when navigating. Use gestures everyone is familiar with.
  4. Designer is also a performer – make them look good
  5. Height is important. Make sure user can reach the cancel button
  6. Adjust the drag and inertia on objects. Don’t make large objects feel “heavy.”

Designing with Real Data

  1. Fake data = fake design = fake feedback = wrong decisions. Real data will enter the equation eventually.
  2. Understand the data
  3. Organize data into information to enable users to gain knowledge
  4. Real data has a min and max, an average and a distribution. Think about this when designing screens with potentially extremely short or long text. Consider the outliers.
  5. You can do a lot with Indesign Datamerge/Kimono/Chartwell fontface/Sublimetext/Screenscraper chrome extension.
  6. Ben Salinas (@bensalinas) from Involution Studios is a REAL unicorn.

Design Psychology

  1. Self-determination theory levels: amotivated/external/introjected/identified/integrated/intrinsic
  2. Motivation is autonomy, competence, relatedness
  3. If you want people to do something, minimize external pressures and maximize internal ones
  4. Establish shared rules of engagement
  5. Convey belongingness
  6. If you use social media – be responsive to your customers.